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Boughs, Berries and Branches!

Boughs, Berries and Branches!

It's just about that time... when the snow will be flying and we will say farewell to our fall planters, pumpkins and mums.

Before those pots of soil get tossed in the compost pile (or freeze solid in the pots!), there is time to re-dress them for the winter season.

Here are a few tips for the greenery conversion...

1 - Container arrangements of boughs and branches need a good solid base if they are going to stand up to winter conditions and hold branches in place.  For many planters, the root mass and soil from your summer/fall plants can work well.  Simply trim plants off at soil level.  This leaves a firm base to push boughs and branches into.  If you have already emptied your pots or have new ones to fill, a good base can be created with blocks of floral foam and heavy soil or sand for weight.  

2 - Once your base has been established, a variety of evergreen boughs can be selected to provide different colours and textures. Local and exotic greens suitable include varieties of Balsam and Fraser Fir, Red and White Pine, Eastern White and Western Red Cedar, Boxwood, Oregonia, Juniper and Incense Cedar. Evergreen boughs are usually cut  to size suitable to be proportional in the container.  When trimming your boughs, try to cut on an angle so you have a sharp point to push into the base.  Insert each bough firmly into the base so the arrangement will better handle winter winds, freezing rain and heavy or drifting snow.

3 - Dress it up!  Natural accents such as dogwood, curly willow, birch, berries and pinecones look suitable for the entire winter season.  Add a little glam for the Holidays with seasonal accents and ornaments.  Choose from traditional red and green, gold and silver metallic, or try the trendy newer colours such as blue with copper, rose gold and burgundy with champagne, or the ever popular natural colours of white birch with browns and greens.  In January, the overly glitzy bits can be removed and the remaining arrangement can continue to decorate your home until March.

  

  • Kristin Ego
Plant Fall bulbs now for spring colour!

Plant Fall bulbs now for spring colour!

Fall is the time to think ahead to next spring if you want colourful Daffodils, Tulips, Crocuses and more to enjoy once the snow has left.

Hardy fall bulbs such as daffodil, tulip, hyacinth, crocus and snowdrop are spring flowering plants that must be planted in the fall. They are mostly native to mountainous areas of Europe and the near east — Spain, Turkey and Afghanistan. They actually need the dormant rest period of a long, cold winter. The melting snow and ice in early spring provide needed moisture as they start to grow and flower. Plant from September to December, even after the first frost if the ground can still be worked.


Planting
Bulbs can also be planted in individual holes. Dig a hole and sprinkle a tablespoon of a bulb fertilizer in the bottom of the hole. Place the bulb in the hole with the pointed end up.

Cover the bulb with soil and water thoroughly. A 5 cm layer of mulch on top of the bed will help prevent winter weeds, retain moisture and insulate against severe winter cold and temperature fluctuations.

Preparing a bed for fall planted bulbs
Prepare the bed - double digging will help to make a well-drained planting bed.
Condition the soil - Improve soil by adding three inches of peat moss and one inch of composted manure or a 3-in-1 soil mix. Then work into a depth of 30 cm. Add 1 kg bonemeal for every 92.9 m2 (1000 sq.ft.)
Plant — the sooner the better
Point bulb upward. Add sprinkle of blood meal or Actisol (with Hen Manure) to deter squirrels from stealing bulbs.

Add 2-5 cm of mulch.

After spring flowering the foliage must be allowed to remain to soak up sunshine and replenish the stored energy in the underground bulb. Only the flowering stems should be removed. In a few weeks, the foliage withers and dies down. This is the plant's natural defense against the too hot summer sun in its original habitat.


Replanting your flower bed with summer annuals gives you the opportunity to use more bone meal which, with its high phosphorous content, is beneficial to both the new planting and the bulbs.


In-Store Shopping Health and Safety Expectations

In-Store Shopping Health and Safety Expectations

In order to facilitate a safe experience for all our customers and staff, please note the following expectations:

* If you have been in contact with anyone with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19 or if you are sick or feeling un-well, PLEASE REMAIN AT HOME. 

* Follow the physical distancing guidelines at all times... in lineups, in the nursery and greenhouse and with our staff members.

* Wear a mask or face covering when entering the market building

* Please apply hand sanitizer available at entry 

* Shopping carts will be sanitized regularly.

* No outside food or beverages.

* No pets permitted

* Washrooms will not be available.  Please plan accordingly.

* Please stay behind plexiglass screens while at the checkout.

* Currently we are open 9:00 am - 5:00 pm daily  

Thank you!

 

 

  • Kristin Ego
PW Idea Book

PW Idea Book

We grow many of the varieties featured in the annual PW Idea Book.

Click here to download a little inspiration for 2020

  • Kristin Ego
Classic Blue Named Pantone Colour of the Year

Classic Blue Named Pantone Colour of the Year

ANNOUNCING THE PANTONE COLOR OF THE YEAR 2020

PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue

Instilling calm, confidence, and connection, this enduring blue hue highlights our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era.

A timeless and enduring blue hue, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue is elegant in its simplicity. Suggestive of the sky at dusk, the reassuring qualities of the thought-provoking PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue highlight our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era.

Imprinted in our psyches as a restful color, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue brings a sense of peace and tranquility to the human spirit, offering refuge. Aiding concentration and bringing laser like clarity, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue re-centers our thoughts. A reflective blue tone, Classic Blue fosters resilience.

  • Kristin Ego
Lantana - Easy Growing Butterfly Magnet

Lantana - Easy Growing Butterfly Magnet

Lantana has a rich history of being utilized in the garden for long-lasting, colorful blooms, superior heat tolerance and the ability to attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Featuring clusters of bright colors, solid as well as multi-color, Lantana can be used in containers, landscaping and hanging baskets.

In the 18th century, lantana was a popular greenhouse plant in Europe and breeding efforts were extensive, resulting in hundreds of available selections.

There are 150 species of lantana in the verbena family (Verbenaceae) and the most commonly used ornamental selection is Lantana camara. Hardy to zone 8, this plant can be a perennial (tender perennial in zone 7) or even a medium shrub in frost-free locations. It is most commonly used as an annual in colder areas.

 

Pollinators love Lantana - Year of the Lantana - National Garden Bureau

Butterfly Heaven

Looking to attract butterflies in your garden? You can’t go wrong with lantanas!

Lantana is a must-have for creating a pollinator haven. These plants are REALLY attractive to butterflies, bees and hummingbirds on so many levels: sweet nectar for food, attractive scent, bright color, and the overall flower form (it’s a literal landing pad!).

These flat-topped “landing pad” flowers consist of clusters of tubular blooms that together make an umbel flower form. Lantana flowers come in single or multiple colors. Multiple colored lantana flowers change color as they mature. The newest flowers, opening in the center of the umbel, are one color that changes as they mature and move to the outer edges of the cluster. This maturation of the flowers within the umbel can lead to two or even three-toned flowers. The flowers come primarily in shades of red, orange, yellow, white, pink, purple or lavender and often have a slight, spicy flower fragrance.

Lantana Little Lucky Red by Ball Flora - Year of the Lantana - National Garden Bureau

Ready for the Heat and Drought!

Want a flower that keeps on flowering throughout the summer is scorching heat and dry conditions? Then Lantana is the perfect plant to grow in your garden and containers!

These plants love the heat and like to be kept on the drier side. They do best in full sun and well-drained soil and hate to be overwatered.

Breeders have recently introduced sterile, or near sterile, Lantana, which means the plant never sets seed, so they continue to bloom and bloom and bloom through the entire season! So, when that heat kicks up, these sterile varieties won’t set seed or cycle out of flower. (setting seed usually means the end of flowering).

Compact or Trailing

Lantanas fall roughly into two forms: compact or trailing. Compact, mounding plants are readily available and perfect for small spaces and containers. Trailing forms, which can spread up to three feet, are ideal to economically fill in larger areas with an impressive display of color. When purchasing your Lantana, always consider the final plant size as some can get quite large.

Home Gardening Tips

  • Continuous blooms and easy care make Lantana perfect for those new to gardening.
  • Lantanas grow best with at least 8 hours of full sun and in a variety of well-drained soil (they do tolerate salt). Avoid overwatering or placing them in poorly drained locations.
  • In the spring, home gardeners will find Lantana plants at their local garden retailers and through some plant catalog companies.
  • In colder climates, plant after the threat of frost has passed and ideally after the soil has warmed.
  • Very few diseases are found. Powdery mildew may become an occasional issue, particularly during cool, wet summers and in situations where proper air circulation isn’t available. Root rot and sooty mold will occasionally become factors in overly damp situations as well.
  • Overfertilization may result in more stem and foliage growth at the expense of flower production.
  • Deadhead (removing spent blooms) regularly to keep the plant tidy and neat.
  • If your plant becomes overgrown, prune it back severely to maintain a more compact form.
  • Deer and rabbits avoid Lantana because of the “disagreeable odor” of the leaves.

  • Kristin Ego